Link List #65: Pertinent words from Roxane Gay on feminism, the social necessity of libraries, and a sad adieu to the incredible Ren Hang
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Journal > Link List #65: Pertinent words from Roxane G…

We began this week mourning Chinese photographer Ren Hang, a man who endured censorship and intimidation in a remarkable career that finished far too abruptly. For links that remember him, and for those that will distract and let you forget, scroll on.

Link Up:

  • Ren Hang, one of the bright stars of contemporary Chinese photography, passed away this week at just 29. The prolific artist leaves behind an influential and controversial oeuvre, we hope he rests in peace.

  • ‘Good History/Bad History’ expresses an enduring faith in Modernism: for its belief in the present, its awareness of the future and its desire to use design to change the world. Penned in 1991 by design greats Tibor Kalman, J Abbott Miller and Karrie Jacobs, the polemic has not lost its relevance: download the PDF here.

  • Like books? Girls At Library (GAL) is an online journal that features interviews and book recommendations from remarkable, diverse women who share a passion for reading.

  • “If you are going to cut libraries you must be prepared to build more prisons, to build more homeless hostels.” This article from The Guardian discusses the social necessity of libraries through a case study of the The Cologne Public Library’s ‘Sprachraum’: a social and educational space for the city’s refugees.

  • Miss Microsoft Paint? Scrich is here to save the day.

  • International Women’s Day is just around the corner, we’re celebrating with the wise words of Roxane Gay. Discover why she is, and we are, bad feminists.

Thanks for reading! We hope our links inspire you and give you a small window into what the FvF office is enjoying this week.

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Text: Rosie Flanagan