Introducing Thinglink

Sometimes it only takes a few seconds to like a person – a genuine smile, a witty comment or simply a consuming outfit. After a while, when having spent more time together, you often discover layers of the other individual‘s personality that may confirm your first impression, intrinsically adding complexity. Visiting someone at home is often a true revelation and shortcut to get to know the entire person.

Having that in mind, a couple of weeks ago we started to integrate a new feature in our portraits: tagging details in our photos via Thinglink. Through this, we add an interactive, second layer of storytelling to our brief and humane adventures.

Immersion, interactivity, integration, impact – as discussed by media scholars and philosophers, such as Vilém Flusser, Alexander Kluge and Niklas Luhmann since the late 60s, non-linear storytelling through hypermedia emphasizes the reader’s role in the process of media consumption. Christian Meier recently converses about the future of storytelling on his blog.

To use technology in a new, sometimes experimental way, in order to tell relevant anecdotes about interesting people, is part of FvF and we feel like Thinglink can only emphasize this want. The apps‘ capability to tag various media types, such as a soundcloud music stream or a youtube video to our pictures, enriches the overall experience that we offer through our portraits.




Who would have thought that the holes in Bent Angelo Jensen’s ceiling come from opening an abundance of champagne bottles with his friend’s help, photographer Daniel Josefsohn, just after having spent a night partying in Hamburg?







Or the perhaps ironic incident that, while shooting nightlife staple Ralf Köster at Golden Pudel Club, our photographer Pelle Buys thought of some tracks he later on selected for his FvF mixtape, which you can check out right away by clicking the very link.







Working with some of the most influencial artists of our time, for instance Daft Punk and The White Stripes, director Alexandre Courtès decorated his Parisian apartment with movie memorabilia – a youtube link adds a film history crash course to the beautiful graphic designs depicted on his wall.




The new interaction and storytelling possibilities with multiple layers and elements are already in heavy use all across the internet. This will play a bigger role in the future, not only in regards to entertainment and journalism, but also in e-commerce. The contextual hover and rollover functions within videos, as well as intuitive shopping via links in pictures, are steps towards this direction. Further in addition to this are the various research and development efforts that automatically recognize items and people in images and videos.

We embrace new possibilities that come (not only) with new technology, while constantly keeping in mind that every step we take is subject to constant iteration and development.

We are curious to hear what you think about this new additon to our FvF portraits.

Thank you Ulla & Jonas at Thinglink as well as our friends Igor and Johannes of Third Wave for introducing us!

Text: Sarah Weinknecht

Comments

  1. Miguel Pires da Rosa | 04.09.2012 — 20:42

    This is brilliant; like tidbits of trivia one will get to know through small talk while visiting somebody’s home.

  2. Miguel Pires da Rosa | 04.09.2012 — 20:44

    Also, while this is very cool I suggest not exagerating, leaving a good portion of the pictures without any mark, otherwise you’re hassling the viewer with too much information.

  3. Sebnem Gokcen | 06.09.2012 — 11:06

    Love it. Especially the fact that it fits FvF so perfectly. While reading the FvF interviews, I often find myself staring at the beautiful and inviting photos for a few minutes, trying to catch all the details and make sense of them. I will be thrilled to use Thinglink feature with FvF.

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